The most iconic ads in the Cadbury Dairy Milk cache

It seems like new executions of Cadbury’s ambitious ‘Joyville’ campaign are hitting our screens almost weekly, so AdNews decided to take a look back at some of the brand’s iconic ad campaigns over the years.

Prior to ‘Joyville’, created by Saatchi & Saatchi Sydney and Fallon London, were quirky Dairy Milk ads such as ‘Wouldn’t It Be Nice’, ‘Eyebrows’ and perhaps Cadbury’s most iconic campaign, ‘Gorilla’.

2002’s ‘Wouldn’t It Be Nice’, created by Whybin TBWA Sydney, featured a cover of the iconic Beach Boys track and claymation-style characters.

Colman Rasic executive creative director Dejan Rasic said: “It was, well, nice. It was cute but didn’t change the world of chocolate marketing. ‘Gorilla’, however, is where the brand took on a whole new lease of life.”

Fallon London’s ‘Gorilla’, in which a gorilla performs a spirited rendition of Phil Collins’ ‘In The Air Tonight’ on the drums, was critically lauded and still stands as one the most viewed ads on YouTube.

303Lowe executive creative director Simon Langley said: “It was so different that it initially threw people, but that’s why it worked. It got to the heart of the joy of eating chocolate in a fresh and engaging way. It didn’t feel like a normal chocolate ad.”

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video.

It was two years before Cadbury released ‘Eyebrows’, partnering again with Fallon London. The ad depicted two youngsters performing an elaborate face-wiggling routine to an electro-funk track.

Whybin TBWA Sydney joint executive creative director Matty Burton said: “‘Eyebrows’ was effective in embodying the feeling of eating chocolate for consumers. It was fun and made you smile. [Cadbury] is not a serious brand and it doesn’t need to have an opinion, because it’s promoting a moment of pleasure.”

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video.

In speaking of the brand’s most recent push, he added: “‘Joyville’ is another good extension of this proposition, but Cadbury doesn’t have to stick with the ‘joy’ idea forever – it could go somewhere else fun.”

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video.

This article first appeared in the 21 September 2012 edition of AdNews, in print and on iPad. Click here to subscribe for more news, features and opinion.

Sign up to the AdNews newsletter, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for breaking stories and campaigns throughout the day.

Have something to say? Send us your comments using the form below or contact the writer at amykellow@yaffa.com.au

comments powered by Disqus


latest comments


jobs»