TV still draws eyeballs but the use of connected devices is growing

Sarah Homewood
By Sarah Homewood | 19 December 2014

Australians still spend a lot of time watching television, however time spent viewing content on mobile devices continues to rapidly grow according to the latest Australian Multi-Screen Report.

The results are garnered using OzTAM and Regional TAM television ratings panels, as well as Nielsen’s national NetView panel, Consumer & Media View database and Australian Connected Consumers report.

This quarter the numbers found that Australians across the population watched an average of 96 hours and 58 minutes (96:58) per month of broadcast television (including free-to-air and subscription channels) on their TV's – this is up one hour and seven minutes (1:07) per month year-on-year.

However, time spent on connected devices including internet TV's has all risen, with Australians aged two and upwards spending an average 37 hours and 44 minutes (37:44) online each month on home and work computers.

Australians devoted seven hours and 30 minutes to watching online video on PC or laptop computers (including broadcast TV content and other video), compared to five hours and 18 minutes last year. Tablet penetration is growing too, with 45% of homes now having tablets, up from 42% last quarter and 37% year ago.

The report also showed that 29% of homes have internet-capable televisions (i.e., ‘hybrid’ or ‘smart’ TVs – whether actually connected or not), compared to 22% a year ago.

Matt Von der Muhll, MD, APAC at SpotXchange told AdNews that while TV still draws a lot of eyeballs, he said a shift is on the horizon.

"Traditional TV still commands the lion’s share of screen time, but signs point to a looming shift. In the US, Nielsen is already reporting a significant reduction in linear TV viewing across every age group except 65+, with an accompanying surge in online video. Australia generally follows a year behind US trends, but is expected to catch up rapidly with the spate of on-demand services due to enter the market next year, including Netflix, Stan and Presto,” Von der Muhll said.

"Audiences are splintering across free-to-air, pay, on-demand and streamed content, and can steer their viewing experience, choosing online, offline or hybrid content providers depending on a lean-back or lean-in experience. VideoNuze reports SVOD viewing is now substituting overall for linear TV viewing, rather than augmenting it.”

Von der Muhll said that because of this shift in the video ad market, we can expect to see a consolidation and strengthening of approach under the programmatic banner.

"Treating TV and online video as mutually exclusive categories feels as limiting as marking offline and digital marketing as separate approaches,” he said.

"One is a complement to the other. The focus will shift to how video ads placed in different formats support each other and resonate with the right audiences. And to truly optimise spend across multiple devices, a heavily fragmented media landscape and various data sets, a single, automated platform will be required.”

Find the full report here.

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Have something to say on this? Share your views in the comments section below. Or if you have a news story or tip-off, drop us a line at sarahhomewood@yaffa.com.au

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