Super Bowl 50: Australian advertisers embrace events-based advertising

Arvind Hickman
By Arvind Hickman | 9 February 2016

An increasing number of advertisers are looking to shape creative around successful big ticket sports events such as the Super Bowl and Australian Open.

Seven’s coverage of Super Bowl 50 reached 1.75 million Australians across metropolitan and regional markets, and had an average audience of 536,000. A further 185,000 live streams were reported on Plus7 and 7live.co.au. Seven has secured the rights to the Super Bowl for "a number of years".

“Rather than shaping specific creative for Super Bowl, what we are seeing is advertisers starting to shape their creative for events-based television," Seven's chief digital officer Clive Dickens says. "You'll recall with the Australian Open, advertisers are really taking on the relevance of the event and using stars in the creative.

“If you look at events-based TV like the Australian Open, Super Bowl, AFL grand final and the Olympics, the whole strategy of how brands tell their stories on screens around great big Australian moments is really the creative opportunity.”

Dickens says the Super Bowl's peak audience of 900,000 people smashed previous records and was up 13% on last year.

“The Jarryd Hayne interest and access across ESPN and Seven and the free access into workplaces across browsers and mobiles is giving a cumulative rising tide here. It proves the increasing relevance of this amazing event,” he says.

“There's no better way to cement your brand identity than around event TV and the Super Bowl is a great example of how American TV does that. I see Australian advertisers doing it more and more as we move to a more fragmented environment.”

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