Challenging masculinity norms

15 June 2016

The definition of masculinity is becoming more dynamic through advertising. We take a look at the ads from brands who are changing the way they communicate with men.

1. Man Up continues men’s mental health message with moving ad

The ABC kicked off a national conversation about Australian male suicide with its Man Up series and Triple M's Gus Worland will continue to share the message with an ad campaign. The spot works to move past the outdated notions of masculinity that is killing Australian men. It aims to communicate with everyday men, encouraging them to talk and express...

2. Heineken tackles gender cliches around sport

Publicis Brazil tackles a pervasive gender stereotype head-on in its new spot for Heineken. The ad, called 'The Cliche', opens with the question, “What if you had the perfect excuse to watch the match without your girlfriend?" A group of guys are given the chance to 'gift' their girlfriends a few days at the spa so they can attend the UEFA Champions League...

3. Gillette says ask your dad, not the internet

With mobiles taking over teens lives, boys are increasingly turning to the internet to ask how to do almost everything - from tying a tie to shaving. Gillette has launched a digital campaign to encourage teens to 'Go Ask Dad' for advice instead of the internet. The video from Grey New York for the Procter & Gamble Co. brand shows dads in Spanish, French...

4. NRL addresses mental health awareness

The campaign, State of Mind, by Archibald/Williams, uses the NRL's clubs and players, along with its reach to reduce the stigma around mental illness issues and connect people with services such as Lifeline, Black Dog Institute, Headspace, Le Va and Kids Helpline. It also aims to go one step further than most mental health campaigns which urge Australians...

5. Dove Men aims to break outdated perceptions of masculinity

Dove Men+Care have collaborated with Australian Wallaby David Pocock to break outdated perceptions of masculinity in society and to demonstrate that showing care makes you a stronger person. The ad, titled David Pocock’s Journey to Strength, comes after Pocock took a stance against players using homophobic slurs during football games. In the ad, the former...

6. Headspace targets fathers with powerful campaign

In a new powerful campaign, by The Glue Society, a son tells his father he struggling with his mental health, appearing on the TV in front of his father. The boy says: “I know you think everything is alright with me, but everything is getting on top of me and I can't handle it.” The aim aims to assist fathers to support their sons through mental health...
comments powered by Disqus