Kia serves up interactive ad for the Australian Open

By Nicole Parish | 7 January 2014
Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

Kia has launched an interactive campaign to drive engagement during the lead up to the Australian Open. Kia, which has been sponsoring the sporting event since 2002, has collaborated with mobile agency Mnet to create an interactive game.

The game allows audiences to return a high-speed tennis serve direct from their internet connected TV television, using a smart phone and app as a tennis racket. The ball is served at 263kph by Australian tennis player Sam Groth, with the top scores showcased on the Kia website.

Kia will also launch six ads delivering six different serves, an online practice court, and digital outdoor activations to support its sponsorship of the Australian Open.

The app aims to increase viewers engagement with Kia during the Australian Open which begins next week.

Kia chief operating officer Tony Barlow said: “Kia's partnership with the Australian Open Tennis provides us massive reach to a passionate audience to promote our great range of cars. The 'Game On' app will really enhance consumer enjoyment of the tennis at home in a way that has never been done before.”

CEO of Mnet, Travis Johnson has stated that the aim of the application gives people the chance to feel the pressure and the power of the tennis players serve.

“Game On” is available to download on Android and Apple devices.

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